Budget TT Disc Wheel


#1

Hi - I am thinking of purchasing a disc wheel for my TT bike. I currently use 60mm carbon wheels and was thinking a rear disc may offer some benefits. I would like to run a clincher setup. Any recommendations based upon your experience. Thank you.


#2

HED Jet Plus (Black or reg). Test really fast and maybe half the cost of Zipp, Enve etc…

edit: very pleased with mine.


#3

You can get disc cover for ~$100 to see if you like riding with a disc. I ran one on my Tri bike and raced an occasional TT on it with no issues.
http://www.wheelbuilder.com/product.php?productid=16265


#4

Flo! https://www.flocycling.com/wheels_flo_disc_cc.php


#5

I’ve been looking for a disc that I can swap the axil over in, so I can use it on the road and on the track…
Master racing, everyone has to have a disc…

I have found TWE are reasonably priced
http://TWEbikewheels.com.au (prices are in AUD :stuck_out_tongue: )


#6

Disc wheels are cool but covers are just as fast so if ur on a budget…


#7

I know people say get a disc cover, but I found them to be a massive pain in the arse. Take cassette off, line everything up, cassette back on. Pray that nothing rubs, any gear changes are smooth…it used to annoy me more then anything.

You can pick a 2nd hand disc clincher for not a whole lot, then your done.


#8

If you’re UK based then AeroCoach is a good shout.


#9

Not sure that counts as budget though


#10

It is if you want a new disc wheel!! Second hand will obviously be cheaper.


#11

I think a few people have maybe missed the bit where the OP said “Budget”.

I use a lightweight, wide rim, alloy clincher 24H + disc cover, permanently attached via tiny zipties to keep it tight behind the cassette and black electrical tape all the way round the edge just before you get to the brake track. Very neat transition from tyre to rim to cover, very aero (some say 95% as good as a Zipp etc), no rattles at all, excellent braking in the wet, and very cheap.

Maybe 25% of the cost of a full-on disc for 95% of the aero performance.


#12

Another +1 for a disc cover here. I have a carbon one, attached with tiny cable ties and electrical tape as mentioned by Darkgerbil.
Very light, very aero and easy to use.
My wheels are 60mm, so it also means that I have a set for all conditions as it’s rarely blowing hard enough to make me change the front. It’s nice being able to put the covers in the bike box and then I don’t have to worry about race day conditions when I travel.
If I changed to a full disc, it would make about 1-min difference over my HIM bike split, I just cannot justify that investment - the money would be better spent on aero testing or coaching.
As I heard once - wheelcovers - the wind see’s a disc, your wallet see’s $$$ :slight_smile:


#13

Real budget

disc


#14

I’d recommend the premier disc wheel. If you email Dan soon he may give you the black friday deal on it as well.


#15

Paying an extra $900 is a bigger pain, in my humble opinion


#16

I have an older set of Enve 6.7s with a wheel cover on the rear that I use for my TT setup. Works fine but I have pretty severe gear envy when I see the discs so I’ll probably be upgrading eventually


#17

@jamiewallis, the best idea is to actually make up a permanent disc wheel with a lightweight alloy rim wheel with disc cover meticulously fitted.

No rattles, no rubbing, no pain in the arse, just lots of money saved for almost identical aero credentials to an expensive full-on disc.

Don’t get me wrong, if I had the spare cash I’d probably buy a disc but the OP was asking about budget options and the disc cover is a perfectly good option for those whose disposable income is limited, with almost no drawbacks.

Any decent used disc wheel I’ve seen is about twice the price of a disc cover + alloy wheel option.


#18

If you are going to use a cover do this. Just figure the cost of buying a wheel set for this if you don’t have one.

Otherwise buy a real disc. Attaching a cover with tape and fasteners was simply not realistic for me. The cover eventually developed tears around many of the fastener holes. And the whole taping was just not me. I threw mine out.

I found a used Renn for $200 then finally bought a HED Jet plus clincher new for $870. The only problem with the Renns you might find is many are tubular. Again not a big deal but, now your buying tubular tires which can be expensive and a little more time consuming with gluing. A new Renn 555 clincher is $795. Again, for a little more you can get a lenticular.


#19

I’m in the same situation at the moment. Not sure the financial director (wife) will appreciate another wheel arriving in the post!

Having said that, I’ve been looking at Ron Wheels - they seems pretty reasonable. Or alternatively a Wheelbuilder disc cover for my rear Flo 30. Choices, choices!

As another option, has anyone permanently fitted (i.e. glued!) a cover to an old rear wheel they had lying around? I’ve often wondered how that would work out.


#20

@GregH, my Aerojacket disc cover is as good as glued on. I used a good quality (3M) electrical tape very carefully applied to the edge of the rim, zip ties behind the cassette, duct tape to hold to the non-drive spokes.

I’ve used it for three seasons, in all weathers. It’s as good as new. The tape bond becomes stronger with age. Because there is zero movement, not only is it rattle-free but there is no wear to the studs or holes. The lenticular shape and transitions from tyre to rim to cover are indistinguishable from a disc wheel.

The disc cover snobs may be missing the fact that many “disc wheels” are the same as this - a spoked alloy wheel with a bonded cover.

I had the wheel, an H Plus Son Archetype rim, which fits the cover designed for the Mavic Open Pro. The transition to brake track is made perfect by sanding the very edge of the cover with 120 grit on a small block before fitting. Total cost was around £80 UK Sterling.

EDIT: since these photos were taken I’ve swapped out the 25C for 23C for an even better aero transition.