Chain Waxing Tutorial


#61

I bought mine from an ebay seller


#62

We’ll see how two unmarked zip bags from China of fine white powder do, lol


#63

I’ve had good luck recently with Wend wax…just started using it on a new chain in July and it’s done really well for me - keeps the drivechain clean and quiet, easy to apply/remove. Couldn’t be happier with it. I do keep the wax stick in the fridge so it’s not too soft when I apply it- my wife thinks it’s pretty weird.


#64

Yes, that’s the point that’s being made.


#65

Nothing other than normal. I replace mine annually so I don’t really push the lfecycle too far


#66

Never heard of Wend. Just looked it up and it seems brilliant! It sounds like the next logical step in chain waxing; commodify wax to remove the need to remove your chain.


#67

Review and testing of Wend Wax


#68

Have you guys seen a definitive increase in life on chains/cassettes/rings since using wax?


#69

Well that settles it, def not using the Wend Wax stick!


#70

Not a hugely glowing review is it :hushed:


#71

I picked up a small, perhaps 0.65 Qt, crockpot. It’s only 40W. I’ve yet to try it out, but suspect it’s just not powerful enough to melt the wax. I’m thinking now that it is spec’d to warm a sauce, and not cook something.

What is the wattage of your crockpot/slow cooker?

I plan to buy the smallest one I can find which has sufficient watts. I’m guessing it will be 2Qt to get the Watts high enough?

Thanks,


#72

I take my hat off to you lot doing this. I can barely be bothered to apply lube or wash my bike! :joy:


#73

Yeah, 0.65qt sounds small. I got a “tiny” 1.5qt one last year and it just barely fits a rolled up chain in a single layer. As for the wattage, I don’t think that really matters as long as it has a “hi” and “lo” setting. These are temperatures common in slow cooker recipes, so they’re pretty standard across pots. A higher wattage pot might melt the wax faster, but once it’s up to temp the heating element will only turn on intermittently to hold the temperature.


#74

I think it’s better, but I have no quantification of this. Luckily cycling tips does.


#75

I have the same one. Harbor Freight is great for stuff that if it sucks you can just buy another a second one for the same price as one would’ve cost from elsewhere. In this case it was worth the risk as mine has worked great.


#76

I’m not sure the volume on mine but it is the smallest I could get on Amazon. It is 100W though. You definitely don’t want it to be too hot as I think the wax can technically catch on fire.


#77

I am seeing nothing wrong with using connecting pins to refit the chain. Certainly cheaper. Am I missing something?
Example https://www.bikebug.com/shimano-11-speed-chain-connecting-pins-3-pack-p-59709.html


#78

Thanks. When I tried to see how 40W worked with water, it took hours to get much beyond warm … there’s no chance it’ll catch fire. I’ll see what goodwill has this weekend.

My ideal solution is sufficient volume to do a chain without overflowing/spilling, but with enough watts to melt the wax and be ready in <60 mins I guess. Something I can do on a weeknight, and not need to wait for a weekend.

Thanks,


#79

Connecting pins at that price works out to $2.90 per chain install. I just switched to YBN chains, and a pack of 6 YBN master links is $19.99, or 3.33 per master link. YBN claims their master links can be used 5 times, which brings the cost down to .67 per chain install; but even re-using the master link once it is only $1.67 per chain install.


#80

A tangential video.