First British Cycling e-racing champion stripped for cheating

Looks like Cameron Jeffers used a bot to ride around at 2000 watts at a low body weight to get the fastest bike to use in the actual racing.

Seems like a pretty extreme length to go to for just a tiny advantage. Sounds harsh but if you’re prepared to do that people are going to be asking what lengths you’re going to in real life training too I guess.


Edit by Chad McNeese, to add link to DCR post:

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Crazy situation. Who says any of the entrants rode any time on Zwift to unlock any in game extras.

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British eCycling National Champ busted…I think this was only the second national champ competition held (after Australia) and already there is cheating. From Cycling Tips…

British Cycling has stripped Cameron Jeffers of his national e-racing title after upholding a sanction “related to manipulation of pre-race data to gain an unfair advantage via in-game equipment.”

The exact details of Jeffers’s methods were not announced. He initially claimed the e-racing national title in March of this year.

“Defending fair play in our competitions is at the core of our responsibilities as a governing body,” said British Cycling integrity and compliance director Rod Findlay in a statement. “The fact that we have been able to investigate the offense and uphold the charge reflects the strength of our new disciplinary regulations and our determination to pursue misconduct.”

Jeffers has accepted a six-month suspension from competition and a fine of £250. James Phillips, initially the runner-up, has been declared the new national champ.

Worth watching this too

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He used an ant+ simulator to get the tron bike before there was ever even an esports championship. Which is a fucking dumb ban because he’s climbed enough to have gotten the tron bike anyways in the meantime https://www.zwiftpower.com/profile.php?z=9659

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So he basically admits to what he was accused of, engages in some “WhatAbout-ism” against British Cycling and then talks about how hard he worked, how unfair it all was (but yet doesn’t want anyone’s sympathy) then tosses in some moral relativism for good measure (“Hey, the Tron bike that I cheated to get isn’t even really the fastest bike in the game”)…

Meh…not really impressed with his “defense”.

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I will freely admit I have no idea what the hell it’s all about.

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I don’t really get his popularity, I’ve seen a couple of videos and it’s not like informative or anything.

I think it’s fair to hold the past cheating against him if he wouldn’t have had the tron bike by the time the national champs without the assistance.

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Agreed. “Other people cheat too…” was another angle he seemed to use. His tangent on the weight saga and timing is irrelevant. Sure, there are times and ways that the explicit guidelines aren’t follow, but the spirit is there.

I get that the Brit rules came after his violation, but if Zwift Insider is correct, he violated the Zwift Terms & Conditions in obtaining the Tron bike, so that still points to a problem in my eyes.

He is owning part of the issue with the admission, but also shifting blame in annoying ways. He got a bike fraudulently and proceeded to use it. Rules or not, that is a bad moral call no matter how he tries to justify it.

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You forgot the point where he points out that the rules that he broke didnt exist when he broke them

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but I covered it ^^^ :stuck_out_tongue:

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But he was banned for breaking the rules, not for being an immoral person.

I dont at all defend what he did, but i can sympathise with him given the circumstances and its only fair to expect all rules to be applied and enforced across the competition

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This whole situation is cringeworthy on all sides. Incredibly stupid.

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the dude avgs over 10,000 miles per year and like 500,0000+ft of climbing, , the whole bike advantage is already dumb in the first place

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honestly they should probably eliminate bikes as a factor and not give any competitive advantage to wheels/bikes in zwift.

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I don’t really care about any advantages “in game” or really even in a general race on Zwift (I’m just there for a workout, not to “win” a race)…but yeah, if you are gonna be handing our national jerseys, everyone should be on the same bike / equipment, IMO.

(yes, I know everyone is not on the same bike / equipment IRL…I’m OK with that duality. YMMV.)

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IRL have the randomness of weather, crashes, and luck (ie flats, and mechanicals, etc)

In virtual everything is almost the same, all that differ is the power of each rider and tactics. I think same bike and equipment is a must once you pass a certain selections of rider, specially in any finals setting.

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Ray’s take on the situation:

It’s silly to allow pre-competition trinkets earned in game to affect the outcome of the competition. Pinball games have special tournament modes for similar reasons so that the previous state of the game (bonuses, etc.) don’t affect the score of the next game. Giving an in-competition advantage to the person with the most power-ups makes the whole thing a lot less interesting. My guess is that zwift likes this angle as it forces fit people who want to compete in zwift races to spend a lot of time using zwift for the trinkets they need to be competitive. Without this, people who otherwise don’t zwift much could be competitive, and this is something that zwift likely wants to discourage.

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Punishment does not fit the crime!

Now you have a young pro getting his name dragged through the mud for “cheating” which on first read of the news headlines or forum threads leads people to believe he cheated during the races which is not the case.

Black eyes for all involved.

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