Pick for best 2019 Tri Bike?

#1

If you were in the market, (which I am) what would be your pick? There are so many good bikes to choose from I’m having a hard time deciding. I like the Specialized Shiv, Cervelo P5 and Canyon Speedmax. Which would you chose and why? If something other than those three please feel free to add more options!!

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#2

I’d get the P3x if just using for Tri. P5 disc if TTing.

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#3

Maybe I should clarify. I do full and half IM tris. The new P5 seems built for triathlon more than time-trailing with all the storage for food.

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#4

Can’t really beat the value of the Canyon.

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#5

Giant Trinity

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#6

Purely a personal opinion obviously but I’d choose a more TT focussed bike and add my own storage options to it than be constrained/over provided for on a bike that thinks it can predict my needs for all distances.

Again for me, I don’t feel the need for disc brakes or the need to upgrade all the wheels I already own so I’d go for the older P3 or maybe a Speed Concept. If you’re willing to build up your own bike as well with the judicious choice of other components you can make some good savings and get a very fast bike.

If you’re in a position to buy off the shelf get whichever one that both fits and appeals to you the most. The psychology of feeling fast is important… :grinning:

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#7

P3X for sure!

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#8

Whichever fits the best! They are all sexy and fast. That being said I would throw the Scott Plasma in there. Sebi Kienle’s is amazing.

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#9

I treated myself a Canyon Speedmax last year and I am in love with it. Pro’s for me were the design, value/price ratio as well as German product :wink: Plus the fit was good for me, which probably should be your nr. 1 if you go for long distance.

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#10

That’s a nice option as well. Lots to choose from.

Regarding the statement to find what fits best, how would you decide amongst all of these choices which one fits best. If you go to a LBS that sells Cervelos and Scott’s I’m assuming they would be the best fit. Do you just go shop around and get fit on all of them? Or is there a way to determine amongst all of them which has the best geometry for you.

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#11

You would go and get a professional fit to establish your stack and reach (or if you like your fit you can figure it out based on your current bike) and compare that with the values listed for each of the bikes you are considering.

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#12

Any of them will be able to fit, but some better than others. Mine has an integrated headset that limits how wide the pads can be, for example. But you won’t jnow the potential limits until you know what’s a good fit as described by @brockduke21

I chatted on slowtwitch and used one of the fitters who posts on there from London. I had a frameset in mind before I went, had the fitting done in a gurufit machine and the output uses a database of frameset information so I actually had two options of two different sizes of the same frameset and all the adjustments to make for either. The fitting also took into account the smaller crank arm options. But it did cost £200. Then I bought the frameset, built the bike and raced it a few months later, getting support from the fitter to get things right.

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