Tapering for a 110 mile race

#1

Hello everyone,

I’m on the last week of the mid-volume Century plan. I’ve done the Sweet Spot Base and Sustained Power Build plans (both mid-volume) prior to this. My big race is an undulating 110 mile bike race on Sunday 16th June.

I had given myself a 3-4 week buffer to allow for disruptions but I haven’t had many. My plan is to now replace this last easy week with continued middle-of-plan sessions from the Century plan up until 1st week in June and then ask you guys about a good taper routine.

Any advice appreciated.

Paul

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#2

Sounds like you got 4 weeks until your event. I would finish Week 8 of the Century plan as prescribed and then repeat weeks 5 through 8 of the Century plan. That should have you doing the recovery week leading into your event. If you think you need more recovery time then swap out week 7 with some lower intensity work.

Your idea suggests replacing week 8 with intensity, and adding another 2 weeks of intensity after doing 3 weeks of intensity (total of 6 weeks of intensity) is likely going to push you too far before giving your self a chance to recover.

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#3

I don’t have any quotes off hand but I believe it was Andy Coggan, in one of his technical papers that discussed the duration of a taper in days for different styles of athletes. The summary was for track or crit races (high I.F.) a duration of a week or a little more was ideal. For longer endurance athletes (lower I.F.) a much shorter time period would work, even as low as a day or two.

I would suggest a quick google search to find that paper as it was a good read.

Good luck at your event!

#4

don’t taper too much, as for longer events you need Form over Freshness. That being said, you don’t want to carry a ton of fatigue into it either. A generic taper into the event would be: less volume two weeks out, but still some intensity. Then, week of the event:

Monday: rest
Tuesday: 2 x 10 @ 100% FTP
Wednesday: Endurance Pace, 70-75% FTP, 1.5-2h
Thursday: Openers, 5 x 30s @ 120% FTP, 1 hour total ride
Friday: Rest
Saturday: Openers, 5 x 30s @ 120% FTP, 1 hour total ride
SUNDAY EVENT: CRUSH IT!!!

Brendan - EVOQ.BIKE

#5

Thanks Andy, that makes sense.

Is the last week a taper anyway?

#6

Thanks Brendan, yeah, i was always taught to keep some short intensity leading up to the race.

I think all 3 bits of advice can be combined. Good to hear from you guys, thanks very much. Just hope my new Veloflex Carbon rear tub holds out!

#7

are you sold on using tubular for that? is there a support car behind?
used those exact tires years ago and was not a fan; not scaring you! Just want to give you a heads up.

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#8

Alway faired well with the advice on tapering in here:

Going Long: Training for Triathlon’s Ultimate Challenge https://www.amazon.de/dp/1934030066/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_apa_i_Sqe3Cb8ASDC7T

I’m not a triathlete, find it still extremely helpful

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#9

It’s my biggest fear, i blew 2 veloflex extremes on a race route recce, always the sidewall. I’ve learnt how to change it roadside but it would be the end of a fast time. I’ve looked at other tubs but everyone seems to agree that these Veloflex are unbeatable if you can live with the risk!

Fitness-wise, thanks to following TrainerRoad and advice in the forum, I’m averaging 36kph over the undulating bike route (practjce/training), that was the target
for the race so happy with where I am.

The race in question is a triathlon relay, extra pressure as I’ll let the swimmer and runner down too!

#10

good luck! i wouldn’t want to flat; vittoria pave! lol

#11

The last week of the Century plan is designed to be a recovery week rather than a taper. As mentioned in some of the other replies keep the work load low but throw in some short high intensity intervals.

#12

Have done a fair few long events in both cycling (centuries up to 10+ hour MTB event) and triathlon (Ironman), would say the tapering requirements are significantly different due to the run. Need a much longer taper when running is involved than with pure cycling due to the impact that running has on the legs.