TrainerRoad users' bikes

bike

#270

Mega colourway!!


#271


#272

Love a Cannondale!


#273

Canyon Ultimate SL 9.0. Ready to roll and in action. It’s over 4 years old now and will be turned into a dedicated hill climb bike next year. Those with a keen eye will notice the addition of an R8000 rear mech.


#274

Such a classy look!


#275

Genesis Zero, built up from frameset with mix of Dura ace and Ultegra. Zipp SL bars and stem, Deda super leggero seatpost, Fabric Scoop saddle, DCR 23mm alloy rims on Sapim CX-Rays. Nothing super fancy but it rides really nicely and is plenty stiff and light.

I also have a BMC Roadmachine02 105 but haven’t taken a picture of it yet!


#276

Really quite like this! Have a soft spot for a SuperSix Evo and this is particularly nice.


#277

Nice bike. Might look a bit cooler with a helmet though :slight_smile:


#278

British Hill Climb racing, not required for that but for any other time I absolutely agree with you, I always wear one.


#279

De Rosa Sk Pininfarina
A present to myself in April 2018 - Turbo bike is a Giant Defy 3


#280

Thanks! Had been looking for the frame for a while and ended up finding it on OSM in my size and snapped it up then built up with eTap. Its been a dream so far.


#281

Pinarello Marvel


#282

What kind of seatpost is that?

and very nice wood work as well…


#283

Hi, it’s Canyon’s own VCLS 2.0 seatpost.

(Can’t take credit for the woodwork)


#284

Noticed a lot of carbon rim brake set ups…any tips and/or tricks for the uninitiated?


#285

Make sure that the rims and pads are clean and that there is no glazing on the pads (If pads overheat they harden on the surface and become less effective). If there is, a light going over the pads with some emery paper or something to take the shiny surface off should do the trick.

Set up the pads with a slight toe-in (front of the pads slightly closer to the rim than the rears). It helps clear moisture from the rim before the rest of the pad contacts should you get caught in the rain. It potentially (although I might be making this up…) helps with modulation. Additionally, depending on setup sometimes you can be greeted with an unpleasant screeching from the brakes! It varies between rim and pad manufacturers though, some are more advanced and operate more quietly, but setup plays a fairly big part in this.

The above helps me keep a set of Reynolds Assaults functioning well in braking terms and performing fairly quietly.


#286

In regards?


#287

Braking…maintenance…that kind of stuff. :+1:


#288

Look very very far ahead :sweat_smile:


#289

Well from the basics I would recommend to get a wheel set that can serve as multidiscipline either a 45 to 50mm will do well on most conditions for your first wheel set.

Remember that Usually all Carbon Rim options come with specific brake pads for carbon rims. DO NOT MIX aluminum wheels brake pads with carbon rims at all. The aluminum brake pads collect tiny particles that can scratch and ruin you carbon brake surface.

I have tried different heights all across from 24mm, 35mm, 45mm, 50mm, 55mm, 90mm.

Strictly for Flat roads I will recommend 55 and above. Climbing below 45mm. Strictly TT or Crits 90mm. Remember more height stiffer wheel. Your weight comes in consideration as well.

Also with technology today I would go for wide rims and tubeless ready. There is no reason not to take advantage of this.

There are several brands with good quality and good price. If money is no limit I would chose Enve.

I would not chose Zipp as they seem fragile for my roads.

The best brand where you can find quality and reliable will be Reynolds and they have different models depending on your budget.

I would also check Boyd Cycling, FLO, Mercury. Mercury has a phenomenal customer service. I hit a pothole in descent that should throw me to the ground and the wheel hold incredible. wheel all the way to home. wheel broken but never got out of true M5s. They fixed and sent me the wheel back. You can find them at a really good price at Competitivecyclist.com

I currently have EDCO wheel set 45mm tubeless clincher, 65mm Tubular and 85mm Tubless clincher. HUB is multisystem (campy,shimano,sram). I love them they brake well, the brake pads are similar to Campagnolo red pads which I love. and no issues at all. Also they are not very popular here in USA but they are very trusty hubs in Europe.Several Pro teams are using it now. Also Eddy Merckx bikes used to come stock this wheels.

I have the contact for a supplier for EDCO here in USA. Unfortunately EDCO closed shop here in USA but support now comes from Europe. They auction all assets and all inventory. This wheel set where sold at 2200 dlls you might be able to get them for 800-1K. I think they are listed on eBay.

If you have another question just let me know Im happy to help.