TT bikes and lorry back draft

#1

Did my first proper TT ride in heavy traffic earlier and was prepared for fast moving lorries coming both ways and the back draft that comes when they pass at 60+ mph.

I’d grab the base bars each time and got thrown about a bit but I’m used to it from the road bike and even on deep wheels am alright.

Question for experienced TTers is can you handle that back draft in your TT position? Does this come with experience or is it a wipe? Was considering trying one lorry pass like that to see for myself but chickened our. The road I was on was a bit too quick to mess around…

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#2

Ive raced on single and dual carriageways and never felt the need to come out of position.

But… do whatever you feel keeps you safe, you are better losing a few seconds than having an accident.

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#3

It’s a case of being so confident in the position that you can handle pretty much anything that gets thrown at you? Even really mad back drafts and gusts would you say?

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#4

I’ve never found it too bad staying in the aero position, and I’m skinny. Counter-intuitively, it’s dual carriageways that are easier, as vehicles tend to move all the way into the other lane to overtake you. I’d be more ready to grab bars on a single carriageway where some [censored] might give you a close pass.

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#5

Always do whats safe…
I fucked up the other week when I didn’t leave enough stopping room and a some one braked and indicated to turn left (in Aust) in front of me.
I locked up the back wheel, then blew out the back tire, slid on the rim, then on my side.

Stupid rookie error on the TT (I’m newish to the TT bike.)
as for stability on the TT Core is King, until then you can widen the stance of the elbow cups to allow for a more stable position.




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#6

Ouch!!!
Safety first is indeed the only way to go here.
Very good tip!
For rookies start with the bars a bit high and wide and go lower and closer very gradually.
Fitting is a dynamic process. The optimum position is always completely context dependant.

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#7

I was riding a very fast section of a TT course in South Wales last weekend. It was the first time on the course and there is a downhill section called the Bank.

It was my intention to come off the aero bars and get onto the “normal” TT bars at that point. But a huge lorry came past and it was too dangerous to try and get out of the aero bars at that point. I had to stay in the aero position and try to keep my balance…

I was doing 49mph (79 kph) as I glanced at the Garmin and I was cr*pping myself.

I’ve never gone so fast on the aero bars and it was rather unsettling. But I kept calm and rode it out. One of the top guys in the race hit 55mph (88 kph) going down the hill.

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#8

Without wanting to state the obvious for me it’s about knowing it’s going to happen and staying relaxed. After being slightly concerned the first couple of times I raced on dual carriageways a few years ago now it’s never been an issue since then except in a few cases where the drivers have seemingly made it so deliberately.

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#9

Feel for you Ed, seeing those pics takes me back to October last year when a car ran right into the back of me. I’m new to the TT bike too and don’t know other TTers where I live so I’m just trying to work it all out as I go along. Have less than 10 hours on it so far. Funnily enough it was accident that convinced me to build a TT bike… long time off the bike for recovery and decided to do something to cheer myself up - jump into a part of the sport that I always admired!

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#10

49mph in the skis! Well done! When I go 30 to 35 I feel like I’m risking it…

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